richard c. hale

Review of ‘Frozen Past’

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Fairfax County homicide detective Jaxon Jennings is burned out, has been since the murder of his child and the breakup of his marriage. When the body of a young boy is found under the ice of a neighborhood pool, and he and his partner are called to investigate, his past comes back to haunt him. With the lives of a group of local teens on the line, Jaxon must get control of himself to save them—and himself.

Frozen Past by Richard C. Hale is a thriller with a flawed hero and a merciless killer, and action that moves at a frenetic pace from explosive start to even more explosive finish. Once you start reading this book, you won’t be able to put it down, and when you’re done, you’ll never look at your quiet suburban neighborhood in quite same the light again.

I give this one an easy five stars.

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Review of ‘Blank’

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Lincoln Delabar was born without a face; quite literally, a smooth expanse on the front of his head, with only two holes where his nostrils would be, through which he breathes and takes sustenance, liquids which he cannot taste. But, as with all things, when a door closes, a window opens. Lincoln, or Blank, as his father dubbed him, has other abilities. He can sense electrical energy, enabling him to ‘see’ things around him, and he can ‘connect’ with people who touch his face, an action which enables a two-way sharing of memories.

As Linc, his favored name, reaches puberty, he develops friends and contacts beyond his mother and sister—his father having deserted the family because of his inability to cope with both Linc’s deformity and his power—including his uncle, Joey, who is hiding some dark secret, Tuck, a neighborhood boy with whom he develops a close and enduring friendship, and a girl who is able to look past his lack of a face and see the real him.

But, he has enemies, too. People who hate him for what he is, and those who fear him for his ability to ‘see’ them.

Blank by Richard C. Hale is not your usual novel. While all its main characters are teens, the theme is decidedly adult, as they struggle with a serial rapist/killer, drug dealers, and high school bullies who sometimes go way too far. It’s tempting to call it a coming-of-age novel, but it’s not that either. What it is; a darn interesting and intriguing read, handled in such a way that you find yourself believing that such a creature could actually exist.

A five-star premiere to what I predict will be a series that will acquire a cult following.