management

Review of ‘Time Management Mastery’

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One of the keys to success in any endeavor is learning to effectively manage time. There are a finite number of hours in each day, and if you fail to adequately manage them, more tasks than hours to get them done. Time Management Mastery by Greg Host is a short book that offers some sage advice for learning how to make the most of the time available to you; learning how to distinguish between tasks that are important (but not time-bound) and those that are urgent (must be done or the consequences are dire).

The author offers nothing that can’t be found in thousands of other pages of books on management, but he does it in a brief, easy-to-read and easy-to-understand form that fits the theme of the book. After all, if an author is going to talk about getting things done in the shortest amount of time possible, the credibility is suspect if it takes hundreds of pages to do it.

A useful book for those who feel there just aren’t enough hours in the day. I give this one four stars.

What to Do When Things Go Wrong

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If there’s one thing in life that’s sure, other than death and taxes, it’s that things will always go wrong. The power will go out, the street you’re on will be closed, or some other roadblock will get between you and the destination for which you’re heading.

When things go wrong, you have to make choices; do you give up, or do you find a way around the obstacle? If you’re armed with a plan, whether it’s a personal quest or a professional objective, getting around or over obstacles becomes less of a problem. If you don’t have a plan, you find yourself wasting precious time trying to figure out what to do.

Make no mistake about it; if you fail to plan, you’re planning to fail. Even with a plan, things will often go wrong – no plan survives the first shot. So, it’s not enough to just plan; you must plan intelligently.

Not to worry, though; learning to plan effectively is as easy as learning to ride a bicycle. I’ve written a little book, based upon my fifty years of experience in the government bureaucracy, of the lessons in planning that I had to learn the hard way. I offer it to my readers in the hope that it will help them get to where I am in far less time than it took me.

It’s simple really. My philosophy is, ‘there’s always a Plan B. When Plan A runs into a roadblock, I’ve anticipated it, and immediately move to Plan B. You can too.

 

If you want to learn how to make planning easy, and more effective, get your copy of There’s Always a Plan B today. It’s available in paperback or Kindle version at the links below.

 

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There’s Always a Plan B: How to Cope When Things Go Wrong by Charles Ray  (Oct 14, 2013)

$6.50             $6.18 Paperback                 

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There’s Always a Plan B by Charles Ray  (Oct 13, 2013)

$2.99         Kindle Purchase    

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Review: “Management Matters” by John Hunter

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Management Matters: Building Enterprise Capability, by John Hunter. Curious Cat Media.

This work has no ISBN.Russell Ackoff at Washington University in St....

In the opening chapter of Management Matters: Building Enterprise Capability, author John Hunter writes, “I believe most of what managers should know was written down decades ago.” I take the meaning of this sentence to be, ‘there are no new management ideas or techniques.’ The author does not, in fact, offer anything new. But, he does provide an analysis of the ‘old’ ideas that he believes to be effective in making an enterprise, any enterprise, more productive.

Hunter calls on the philosophies of such management and leadership gurus as W. Edwards Deming, Russell Ackoff, and Taiichi Ohno, to show how anyone can, with some degree of effort, turn an organization around and make it more capable.

This is a relatively useful book for someone who wants an introduction to management, but there are a few flaws that I feel compelled to point out. First, the author focuses on management, and seems to ignore the importance of effective leadership in building enterprise capability. There are several typos in the book, and some formatting issues in the e-Book version that are a bit distracting, but only of limited negative impact. The area that really needs attention, though, is editing to correct grammatical errors through the text.  This sentence, for instance:  “People who are not willing to learn from the most useful management experts may still be able to accomplish some decent things, but they are very large barriers to reaching the full potential possible from wise management efforts.” I have bolded the areas of the sentence that give me pause.   Another example: “I don’t have much patience for managers not willing to learn from the experts.” The decline in proper use of the language, brought on some believe by the proliferation of electronic media, has inured many of us to hasty grammar, but in a book about enterprise capability, this detracts greatly from what is otherwise a good little book.

The author says that he will be updating the book from time to time. Even with its faults, I enjoyed reading it, and sincerely hope some judicious editing will be his top priority for a subsequent edition.

I give it two of five stars for effort.

 
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