don’t tell meg

Review of ‘Don’t Tell Meg’

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On his fortieth birthday, radio journalist Peter Bailey did a stupid thing. Despite, or perhaps because or, his troubled marriage, while away for a working weekend, he slept with a fellow journalist. Unaware of what was going on the room adjacent to his in the motel, he soon finds himself embroiled in a race against time. Did his wife, Meg, witness his infidelity? Who else was in the room with her at the time, and who killed the young hotel clerk?

As you read Don’t Tell Meg by Paul J. Teague, you’ll go along with Peter as he thinks about his past, and all the things he’s done that led up to his current predicament, while at the same time desperately trying to find his wife. While some of the flashbacks can be a bit tedious, in the end, it all adds up to a detailed portrait of a man who has made many wrong decisions in his life, but realized it too late.

The author saved a few surprises for the final pages that will stun you—or again, maybe not. An engrossing read.

I give this first book of a planned trilogy four stars.