cameroon

Daily Prompt: Imagine

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I’m a bit late with this prompt on Imagine People, but I’m recovering from a hip operation, so I haven’t been operating on all cylinders of late. Heck, let’s face it, I’m way late on this one, but what the hey! Here’s my photographic take on imagine. Imagine what this couple is talking about as they sit on a hill overlooking the Cameroonian capital city, Yaoundé. The future? Their plans for the evening? The sky’s the limit.

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Togetherness

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Cameroon: A Photographic Tour

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Located in West-Central Africa on the Atlantic coast, Cameroon has Nigeria to the north, Chad to the northeast, Central African Republic to the east, and the countries of Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and Republic of the Congo to the south. Its location makes it easy to see why many consider it the ‘crossroads of Africa;’ a place where many tribes and cultures meet. A francophone country, with both French and English as the official languages (although French predominates), it has more than 50 tribes, each with its own language.

I had a chance to visit Cameroon in May as part of a Canadian-US media delegation invited to participate in the country’s 38th Unity Day celebration. After the Unity Day parade, my delegation toured Yaoundé and its environs, including a visit to a primate sanctuary, the tourist village of Ebogo, and along the coast, from Batanga Beach in the south to the sprawling port city of Douala (the country’s largest city).

During our tours, we encountered the exotic cuisine, a fusion of France and West Africa, and saw a lot of what the country has to offer in friendly people and magnificent scenery. The visit was all too short, but nonetheless interesting, and I hope one day to return to explore those regions that I didn’t have time for on this short one-week visit.

Following are some of the photos of this memorable journey.

The Unity Memorial in Yaounde
The Unity Memorial in Yaounde
Yaoundé is called 'the city of seven hills,' and in this picture you can see why.
Yaoundé is called ‘the city of seven hills,’ and in this picture you can see why.
A chimpanzee at the primate sanctuary located southeast of Yaoundé.
A chimpanzee at the primate sanctuary located southeast of Yaoundé.
Our guide, who called himself 'the last crocodile,' in front of a tree that's more than 1,000 years old, in the equatorial forest near Ebogo.
Our guide, who called himself ‘the last crocodile,’ in front of a tree that’s more than 1,000 years old, in the equatorial forest near Ebogo.
A hammock on Grand Batanga Beach, south of Douala.
A hammock on Grand Batanga Beach, south of Douala.
Vendors walking along the beach south of Douala.
Vendors walking along the beach south of Douala.
A scene in the grand market in Douala, where vendors from all over the region converge to sell their wares.
A scene in the grand market in Douala, where vendors from all over the region converge to sell their wares.
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Weekly Photo Challenge: The Sign Says

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Okay, this week’s photo challenge is Signs. I hesitated, but as I was going over photos I took recently in Cameroon, I came across this sign for a restaurant I stopped at after visiting the tourist village, Ebogo. Yes, by the way, the sign is accurate – they had serpent on the menu; boa to be exact.

They actually had snake on the menu - freshly killed and cooked.
They actually had snake on the menu – freshly killed and cooked.

 

And, there’s this banner from the Unity Day Parade the day before in Yaounde. I wonder if they realize the implications of this sign? There were dozens of slogans – typical of autocratic, regimented societies, and this is one – but, this one really caught my eye.

Signs, like religious commandments, point out things people are doing wrong. I wonder if the parade organizers realized this.
Signs, like religious commandments, point out things people are doing wrong. I wonder if the parade organizers realized this.

 

Finally, I couldn’t resist this sign – it’s a Francophone country, but they’ve coined this ‘English’ word – ‘Blackitude.’

 

A combination of French and English that is, to an outsider like me, somewhat hilarious.
A combination of French and English that is, to an outsider like me, somewhat hilarious.

 

 

Cameroon’s Primate Sanctuary Attempts to Prevent Extinction of Apes

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For many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, tourism offers the hope of economic development to deal with poverty and overpopulation, but in many cases, development of the tourism sector is hampered by increasing reductions in the very resources that attract tourists. Species of animals are hunted and poached to the brink of extinction, and habitats are destroyed through deforestation and human encroachment.

Some countries are taking steps to reverse this unfortunate trend – small steps, but necessary if the cycle of poverty on the continent is ever to be broken.

One such project, in the West-Central nation of Cameroon, is the Primate Sanctuary at Mefou National Park, south of the capital city of Yaounde. The park was created in 1999, and is currently devoted entirely to the sanctuary project, which is attempting to halt the destruction of monkey and ape species such as the red-capped mangabey, the mandrills, chimpanzees, and gorillas.  Managed by a British NGO, Ape Action Africa, and supported by the Cameroonian government and international donors, the sanctuary cars for 250 primates at Mefou and another 150 at the zoo in Yaounde.

276Most of the animals have been orphaned when their mothers were killed or captured by poachers. Animals are poached for local consumption, either as traditional food or for ritualistic purposes, and for international markets such as Southeast Asia where certain animal parts are used for medicinal purposes. While some of the devastation of primate species is due to animals damaging crops, most of the poaching, according to a guide at Mefou, takes place in primary forests far from human settlements. Poaching has resulted in the virtual extinction of many of the country’s native primates

In addition to providing care and treatment for the animals, the sanctuary conducts education programs to introduce wildlife conservation to young Cameroonians and show the interrelationship between humans and animals. A motto prominently displayed at the Mefou site says, “Where will the great apes be without man? Where will man be without the apes?”234

Mefou is about an hour or so drive from Yaounde, with the last several kilometers over a bumpy dirt road. A knowledgeable guide conducts a walking tour of the facility, which takes nearly two hours and covers more than a kilometer as each species is given an amount of area suitable to its needs. Among the species currently at the sanctuary are gorillas, chimpanzees, mandrills, and some smaller monkeys, such as the agile mangabey and the red-capped mangabey.

Restoring Cameroon’s primate population is a monumental task, and probably beyond the capacity of one sanctuary, but one has to applaud the effort. If nothing else, it goes a long way toward helping mitigate the damage humans are doing to their own environment.

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Did You Miss Me?

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I’ll be disappointed if no one noticed that I’ve been strangely silent for the past week. I spent the week in Cameroon, in West-Central Africa, as part of a Canadian-US media delegation that attended the country’s national day. Just got back home early today. We also had a chance to visit some of the tourist spots around Yaounde and along the Atlantic coast. I’ll be doing more detailed articles here on the blog and on Yahoo, but here are a few of the phot

Lobe Waterfall.
Lobe Waterfall.

os I took while there.

Chimpanzee at primate sanctuary south of Yaounde.
Chimpanzee at primate sanctuary south of Yaounde.
Boat on the Atlantic beach south of the port city of Douala.
Boat on the Atlantic beach south of the port city of Douala.