Month: September 2020

Review of ‘Mink Eyes’

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Peter O’Keefe, owner of a PI agency, is a man with issues. After his wartime tour as a marine, he flirted with drugs and alcohol, before his friend Mike Harrigan talked him into become a gumshoe, a gig that ended up with him running an agency, doing odd jobs for Mike’s law firm, while at the same time, trying to maintain a relationship with his 10-year-old daughter, and a failed marriage.

When Mike introduces him to two men, investors in a mink farm who believe that they’ve been victims of a Ponzi scheme, and they want Peter to find the con man who bilked them and see if he can recover their money.

Peter finds the mink farm, and much more. The scam artist, Lenny Parker, is missing, and his wife, a spoiled woman who happens to be the daughter of one of Peter’s clients, is busy selling their assets and preparing to disappear as well. As if that’s not problem enough, Peter stumbles into a gruesome murder of the two remaining workers at the farm, and the dreadful realization that Parker’s wife is next on the hit list. His efforts to save her then puts him directly in the cross hairs of the mob boss who has been funding Parker’s scam with heavy influxes of cash—and cocaine.

Mink Eyes by Dan Flanigan is a hard-boiled PI novel in the style of the pulp mysteries of the 40s and 50s, with enough gun battles, car chases (and horse chases), and bloody bodies to keep even the most jaded mystery fan satisfied until the stunning climax.

I received a complimentary copy of this book, and give it five stars for its sheer chutzpah.

 

Review of ‘Jai’s Vision’

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Eighteen-year-old Jai a squire in 14th century England, in a time of magic and mystery, is best friends with Lady Amelie, daughter of the ruler. When he starts to have visions, such as a yellow door in the woods that only he can see, Amelie takes him to the kingdom’s mage, who informs him that this is a sign of his fate—that it implies things both positive and negative. Jai is then faced with a dilemma. There are things that he knows, about Amelie for example, that he cannot reveal. His faith and courage are tested to their limits.

Jai’s Vision by noted author Pairas O’Cionnaorth is a short tale for younger readers that is filled with wise and sage advice that is subtly inserted in a tale of mysticism and valor. My only complaint about the story is that ending sort of leaves things hanging insofar as Jai’s future is concerned, but it is still a fascinating little read.

I received a complimentary review copy of this book, and found it quite entertaining. I give it four stars.

Review of ‘Barbouze’

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British journalist, Neil Ingleby, goes to Greece to do research for a book, and to get as far away as possible from the woman who dumped him. He meets Dutch sailor and vagabond Pieter Van Loon and French agent provocateur Charles Pol, who is also a barbouze, or ‘false beard’, and quickly finds himself caught between an army of French defectors and an angry army od Arab nationalists. The line between objective journalist and revolutionary participant becomes blurred, and Ingleby’s life is on the line.

Barbouze by Alan Williams is a riveting thriller in the style of John LeCarre that will keep you glued to your seat, as the action builds inexorably to a surprising climax.

I received a complimentary copy of this book, and give it four stars.

Review of ‘Die Back’

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Addison Shaw inherits a strange pen with which he can write (ink) himself into the consciousness of anyone at any time in the past, and when he dies, he returns to his body. With his fellow inker, Jules, he’s pitted against the machinations of an ancient tyrant who is bent on controlling the world. When Julies is trapped in the body of an ancient Incan princess, Addison realizes that the only way to save the world might be to destroy it.
Die Back by Richard Hacker is a time travel story with an interesting twist, and with enough suspense to make it worth plowing through the dense text.
I received a complimentary copy of this book. I give it three stars.

Review of ‘I Know You’

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After Bree Walker’s younger sister, Alissa, goes missing, she gets a chilling note. The kidnapper will release Alissa, but Bree must trade her brother, Tyler, in exchange.

 

I Know You by Erik Therme is a chilling thriller that follows Bree as she realizes that the kidnapper knows her family’s darkest secrets, and that her brother is involved in something that is far too big for him to handle.  The more she discovers, the worse her situation becomes, and to make matters even more complicated, she must deal with her sister’s best friend who she’s sure knows more than she’s telling, and who insists on being involved in Alissa’s rescue.

 

A heart-stopping story with more twists and turns than a Coney Island roller coaster, this one will keep you turning pages until the ‘out-of-the-blue;’ ending that you won’t see coming. Sorry, I’m not telling. You’ll have to read it for yourself.

 

I give the author four solid stars for a good story.