Month: September 2019

Review of ‘Precious Bones’

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Cassandra is a best-selling novelist who is having trouble starting her next book, when she sees a TV news report about the skeletal remains of a young woman and a baby that have been found in an old Tudor mansion. She feels—knows—that she knows the victims, despite the fact that they died over 500 years earlier. To the dismay of her boyfriend, she buys the house and, after getting rebuffed by the new head of her publishing company, starts to write a story about the bones. Her writing leads her to the Thorne family, who lived in England in the 1500s, and the more she writes, the more she realizes that she has an unbelievable connection to them.

Precious Bones by Irina Shapiro is part fantasy, part historical fiction. The author does an amazing job of bringing the distant past alive as she describes the abuses in the name of religion of the era, and traces a family’s roots from past to present. She puts the reader fully in the picture, and an initially gruesome picture it is. This one, I guarantee you, you will not be able to put down once you start reading.

Review of ‘Fluency’

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In the 1960s, NASA discovered a strange alien ship lurking in the asteroid belt. For years, they kept the ship under surveillance until they finally developed the technology to visit it for an on-site investigation. Language expert, Dr. Jane Holloway, is chosen to be part of the team going to the ship in the hopes that she will be able to decipher any communications they find. But, when they arrive, they discover that the ship isn’t vacant, and the alien residing there needs their help. But, only Jane can understand it.

Fluency by Jennifer Foehner Wells is a riveting sci-fi tale of first contact. A great read for sci-fi fans.

I give it five stars

Review of ‘Shadows in the Water’

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When Louie Thorn was just a child, her parents, DEA agent Jack Thorne and his wife, were killed by the Martinelli family, a gang of drug lords. Only Louie’s ability to ‘slip’ through the shadows saved her from sharing their fate. Now, an adult, she has only one purpose in life; to avenge the murder of her parents. Using her ability, she eliminates the Martinelli gang one-by-one, along with all those who worked for them. Her aunt, Lucy, who shares her special ability, turns to ex-DEA agent Robert King to help Louie learn to live a ‘normal’ life. King, though, is working on a case as a favor to his former DEA colleagues that, while it appears routine, is connected to Louie’s past in a way that threatens both of them, and everyone they care about. Added to this deadly mix, Louie learns that she hasn’t eliminated every Martinelli. One remains, Konstantina, the bastard of the head of the Martinelli clan, has inherited his father’s position. The two of them share a long relationship that began shortly after her parents were killed, when, while sleeping, Louie would sometimes ‘slip’ to his bedroom in Italy. He is obsessed with her, and conflicted over his inheritance. While he knows that if she learns his identity, she will likely kill him, he’s driven by this obsession, and the desire to put things right.

Shadows in the Water by Kory M. Shrum is a mind-boggling paranormal thriller that, with its many twists and turns, will grab your imagination and not let go until the startling conclusion. Warning: this is not a book you’ll want to read on the cliché ‘dark and stormy night.’

I give this one four stars.

Review of ‘Ash Addict’

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Arthur ‘The Hat’ Salzman can’t get a break. He’s practicing summoning demons—out of curiosity, mind you—when an unwanted guest arrives at his little hideaway. As if he doesn’t have enough problems, his guest wants his help finding the ashes of the First Vampire, and Arthur suspects his motives are nefarious. How right he is! Vampires addicted to ashes want to acquire the First’s ashes to usher in a new vampire era, a quest that pits vampire against vampire, and involves a whole host of other beings with powers; and greet. And, right in the middle of this battle that could destroy the world as they know is no one but Arthur himself.

Ash Addict by Al K. Line is book eight in the Wildcat Wizard series, and it doesn’t disappoint. Lots of action, magical and otherwise, as Arthur tries to bring a chaotic situation under control with the minimum amount of damage. Of course, where Arthur’s involved, degree of damage is a malleable concept, especially when he feels his family threatened.

I received a complimentary copy of this book, and, what can I say, I loved it as usual. Don’t let this one slip away.

I give it five stars.

Review of ‘The Legend of Ron Anejo’

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In The Legend of Ron Anejo by Ed Teja, we really don’t know who the narrator is until he meets the title character, vagabond sailor, Ron Anejo. After buying a boat and setting sail for the sunny Caribbean, the narrator, begins running into all sorts of trouble. He ends up on a small island, forced to sell his boat and find another way to sustain himself. It’s there he meets Anejo, who immediately pulls him into his erratic orbit, setting off a series of adventures that could be a long-running TV series, a kind of buccaneering version of ‘Gilligan’s Island.’

Punchy dialogue, graphic descriptions of just about everything, and escapades coming out the ying-yang, this is a book that will have you chuckling almost from the first page. From hapless day charters to a clumsy attempt at smuggling, our heroes (or, perhaps better, anti-heroes) never miss an opportunity to snatch defeat from the snapping jaws of victory, and entertain the heck out of you in the process.

I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for my unbiased review. Thank you for the opportunity, Ed Teja. Oh, yes, and I give it five stars.