New Western Series for Younger Readers

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Outlaw Publishers, a small publisher based in Texas, has just published the second book in the Daniel’s Journey series, western stories for younger readers. The first, Wagon’s West: Daniel’s Journey, the story of a wagon train journey through the eyes of a ten-year-old boy, was published in April.

Daniel’s adventures, however, don’t end with a wagon train trip. My plans are to follow young Daniel as he grows up in Oregon in the late 1800s, maybe all the way to maturity. The purpose of the series is two-fold; first, to introduce younger readers to the western genre, a uniquely American literary form, and secondly, to show that the American West was populated by more than steely-eyed cowboys and lawmen, dastardly outlaws, and Native Americans fighting to retain their land and culture. There were families as well, including children, and I’ve often wondered what life was like for them. In this series, I’m using my imagination, backed up with a lot of research, to create that world for myself, and hopefully, for a lot of new readers.

In book 2 of the series, Wagons West: Trinity, the little town of Trinity has been established near the ranch owned by Daniel’s parents. it too is experiencing growing pains, as people of different backgrounds learn to live together. I also explore the issue of women’s rights in this story, something that I imagine actually might have happened in a few places considering that the first woman to vote in the US voted in Wyoming.

If you have young readers in your household, or on your gift list, consider introducing them to the western. I’ve tried to ensure that these books contain no material that would be harmful to younger readers, but at the same time, make them interesting for adult readers as well.

I would love getting some feedback, on the books as well as the concept. And, if you happen to like what you read, a review on Amazon, Goodreads, or your blog would be most appreciated.

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10 thoughts on “New Western Series for Younger Readers

    Charles Ray responded:
    July 14, 2017 at 2:50 am

    Reblogged this on Asnycnow Radio.

    Like

    Yvonne Hertzberger said:
    July 14, 2017 at 12:37 pm

    At what age do you think a child would understand the stories if they were read aloud? I’m wondering if my bright four-year-old grandson would like that. He loves the Happy Hollisters. Remember that blast from the past?

    Liked by 1 person

      Charles Ray responded:
      July 14, 2017 at 1:29 pm

      I think a four-year-old, with help from an adult, would not only be able to understand the story, but might even be able to read some of it. I know my five-year-old granddaughter can not only read it, but find the typos I missed in the last round of editing.

      Liked by 1 person

        Charles Ray responded:
        July 14, 2017 at 1:29 pm

        Oh, and I hadn’t heard of the Happy Hollisters, but I think I’ll look it up.

        Liked by 1 person

        Yvonne Hertzberger said:
        July 14, 2017 at 3:26 pm

        Sounds like your granddaughter is way ahead of her class. lol. Maybe she’ll become an editor.

        Liked by 1 person

        Yvonne Hertzberger said:
        July 14, 2017 at 3:28 pm

        The Happy Hollisters came out of the 50’s so they are pretty cliche white middle class but my husband loved them as a kid and now my grandson does, too. Very innocent stuff, no pictures, just text.

        Like

    Yvonne Hertzberger said:
    July 14, 2017 at 3:40 pm

    I ordered them both. Had to order via the U.S. site as the Canadian one only has the e-books. Nathaniel turned 4 in April. He doesn’t read at all but loves books. However, he can take a large Lego set aimed at 6-12 year-olds and follow the charted instructions to build them on his own. His father was the same so I hope he hasn’t inherited his dad’s learning disability.

    Liked by 1 person

      Charles Ray responded:
      July 14, 2017 at 5:48 pm

      He sounds like one smart kid. Sorry Amazon Canada doesn’t have the paperback, but hope you like them. I’m doing research on Book 3 for later this year – it’ll feature a bounty hunter (a la Shane) and a ghost town, and the mischief a 12-year old Daniel gets up to when the two are combined.

      Liked by 1 person

    Charles Ray responded:
    July 14, 2017 at 5:49 pm

    I think it’s more likely that my granddaughter, Samantha, will be a writer like me. She’s already making up stories, and did a picture book for me on Father’s Day.

    Liked by 1 person

      Yvonne Hertzberger said:
      July 14, 2017 at 5:52 pm

      That’s so neat. Nathaniel may be musical as he makes up songs and has perfect pitch when he does. He also tells stories but struggles with the visual word.

      Like

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