Review of ‘Death by Bridle’

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When Josiah Reynolds’ friend and lawyer, Shaneika Mary Todd, asks her to help protect her nine-year-old son, Lincoln, who is possibly a witness to a murder, Josiah, still recovering from her near-fatal encounter with rogue cop, O’Nan, agrees reluctantly. The victim, a member of Kentucky’s horse aristocracy, was found strangled, and then hanged in a horse barn. Lincoln, who was found unconscious at the scene, has only a hazy recollection of what he saw before falling and hitting his head.

Death by Bridle by Abigail Keam is the third offering in the Josiah Reynolds mystery series. In addition to being a fairly well-crafted mystery, with tons of clues—many of them red herrings—a long list of potential suspects, and a heroine (Josiah) fearing for her own safety, it has a lot of interesting historical tidbits and social commentary artfully salted into the narrative. No data dumps, these tidbits; they help to move the story forward. History, especially the history of the Old South, where history is never forgotten, and slights always avenged, plays a key role in this tale, which forces Josiah to unearth secrets from the 1960s, secrets that some people are willing to kill to keep hidden.

A divorces, then widowed, beekeeper, who struggles with uncertain finances and a sometimes out of control libido, Josiah Reynolds is a character you can’t help but root for.

I received this book as a gift.

A good story that I liked, but not as exciting as the earlier books in the series. I give this one three and a half stars.

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