Day: November 23, 2015

Review of ‘Devoured’

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A series of terrorist attacks in major US cities infects people, destroying higher brain functions and turning people into flesh-eating monsters. By the third day, the infected are disappearing into the shadows because of their sensitivity to light.

Lance York, an out of work IT type, has all the trouble he thinks he can handle. He can’t find a job and then learns that his wife is having an affair with an old friend—just before she announces she’s leaving him. His day becomes darker when he finds himself at the epi-center of the zombie outbreak, and he has to go on the run in order to survive in a city that is slowly being devoured. He’s all alone until he encounters Cassandra, an eccentric artist with an axe and a skill for survival.

In Devoured, book one of the Hunger series, by Jason Brant, the reader is sucked into a surreal world of monsters, both those infected by the mysterious gas, and some of those who claim to be fighting them. Graphic descriptions of violence and mayhem will probably be too much for those of a sensitive disposition. On the other hand, like people who slow down when they approach a car accident on the road—craning their necks for a sight of blood or dismembered limbs—once you start reading this book, you’ll not be able to put it down.

With a cliffhanger ending, it’ll have you wondering when the author’s coming out with the next one.

I give it four stars.

Excerpt from WIP: ‘Here, There Be Demons’

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Following is an excerpt from chapter 1 of the third book in the Pip of Pandara fantasy series. Appreciate reader comments.

* * *

Pip sat at the large wooden desk, staring down at the pile of documents overflowing its top. He shook his head, and then bowed it, cupping his hands to either side, fingers entwined in his flame red hair.

“This is not how it was supposed to be,” he said to himself. “A soldier is not supposed to have to battle stacks of paper.”

 

Through slitted eyes he stared down at the unruly parchments piled there, silently swearing that they seemed to have grown in number in the few minutes he’d been staring at them. There were supply requests from the quartermaster’s office with Tamara’s untidy scrawl at the bottom of each. Tamara, a fairy of wood and water, did double duty as chief of the quartermaster unit and chief trainer for scouting and reconnaissance. It was the second duty that she much preferred, but her ability with figures had forced Pip to give her the additional duty of keeping track of the many supplies needed to keep his small army feed, clothed and equipped. The volume of requests from her office, though, was her way of getting back at him for the odious office duty which she hated, a fact that she reminded him of each time they met. Beneath that was a smaller pile of documents, mainly from his two regimental commanders, Godfred and Melchor, informing him of their training schedules, plans for recruitment to fill the ranks, and notifications of disciplinary actions—thankfully, there were only a few of these—mostly for minor infractions.

That each of his subordinate chiefs felt it necessary for him to see so much paper was for Pip a constant source of frustration.

What he really ached to do was be out in the field, working with the still green soldiers of Pandara’s national army. No, he reminded himself; fully a third of the ranks were filled by beings from the Land of Fire, making it a combined Pandaran-Land of Fire force. He had yet to think of an appropriate name, so everyone kept the name, National Army of Pandara, shortened to NAP by the soldiers and officers alike. That name would have to go, he thought. He did not want to lead a force called NAP, it sounded too much like a band of vacationers whose aim was to find a place to . . . take a nap. But, try as he might, he’d been unable to think of a more suitable designation.

He felt the beginning of a headache, a dull throbbing at his temples that always came when he wrestled with naming the army. Oh well, that’ll have to be a task for another day. He took the quill pen from its ivory holder, dipped it in the inkwell until the tip was black, and quickly scribbled his name at the bottom of each document. When he’d signed the final document, he stacked them neatly to the left side of his desk. After putting the pen back in its holder, he leaned back and sighed deeply.

A few moments later he sat upright. “Norbert,” he called. “Norbert.”

His aide-de-camp, Norbert, rushed into the office.

“Yes, your highness,” he said. “What do you require?”

Pip looked up at the young soldier. The gold star on his collar, signifying his recent promotion to lieutenant, reflected the light from the lamp on Pip’s desk.

“What I require, Norbert, is for you to call me commander, not your highness. We are in the army here, not the throne room. Here I am the commander.”

“B-but, your high-, er commander, you are the heir to the throne, second only to her majesty, Queen Daphne. It hardly seems appropriate for me not to–”

Pip waved his hand in a choppy motion, causing the young man to stop mid-sentence with his mouth hanging open.

“That is an order, Lieutenant. We will follow military discipline in this army. Am I clear?”

Norbert’s back straightened and he threw his shoulders back.

“Aye, sir, commander, sir,” he said.

“Good,” Pip said. He smiled. “Now, I want you to take this forsaken paperwork from my desk and return it to the authors. I am going to my quarters to have a few words with Lady Zohra, and after that you and I will go on an inspection of the army, so get our horses ready.”

“Aye, commander.” Norbert beamed a broad smile as he gathered the papers. “Should I bring the mounts to your quarters?”

“No, I’ll meet you at the stables.”

Norbert clicked his heels and bowed his head slightly. Pip would have preferred a salute, but the man was holding the documents against his chest with both hands.

“Aye, commander, I will wait for you at the stable.”

Pip rose as Norbert marched smartly out. He could not restrain a smile, thinking that young Norbert just a short time before had been a farm boy, new to the army, when Pip had taken him on the mission against the evil tyrant Tenkuk in Barbaria. The lad had acquitted himself well in that operation, and upon his return, Pip had made him his aide, recently promoting him to a rank befitting the aide-de-camp of the army commander.

Pip adjusted his tunic as he walked toward the door. At the door, he took his sword from the rack and belted it around his waist. Chuckling, he exited his office. Zohra, he knew, would chide him for wearing it when he visited her in her chambers, but he didn’t want to take the time to return to his office for it before joining Norbert at the stable.

As he’d guessed, his wife’s eyes went directly to the sword at his waist when he entered the bedchamber.

“So, now that I’m heavy with child, my husband finds it necessary to arm himself before approaching me,” she said wryly. “Am I truly that unattractive?”

Pip pulled up short, his mouth agape. For a few heartbeats he was at a loss for words. Unattractive? His Zohra? Far from it. He’d found that as her belly grew rounder with the life she carried inside her body, she seemed to become radiant, that he desired her even more. When he gazed upon her face, his breathing stopped, and his heart beat so fiercely he feared it would burst from his chest.

“No, my dearest wife,” he said when he could at last find his voice. “You are without doubt the most beautiful woman in all of Pandara; nay, the most beautiful in the entire known and unknown universe.”

Zohra, now in her sixth month of pregnancy, lowered her gaze. Her cheeks darkened. She could not stifle the smile that turned her carmine lips upward. But, Zohra of Avia, of the Eagle Clan, was not one to let her victim off easily.